Kinect hack to manage home lighting system

No I’m not obsessed with the Xbox, I don’t even have one, but this is pretty cool, where you can see that the Kinect (with major hacking and programming) is used to manage the whole lighting system within the flat…

Simple really, lol ;)

Experience Architecture in website designing

The importance of experience architects in creating or updating a web site is often underestimated. There is a general tendency to fudge the initial user experience phase (sitemaps, personas with their specific user journeys and wireframes) or even skip it and jump straight to concept designs that are then fleshed out to ‘wow’ the client. The whole rationale that consists in understanding what functionalities and services are required on the site and structure them in a coherent manner, hopefully even test them before designing commences, is omitted. Defining the main functionalities of a site, then having an experience architect (who worked on that first phase) to sketch it out and analyse it should precede the functional specifications but most of all the design phase. Designers that have extensive web design knowledge as well as experience architecture knowledge are few and far between so you are unlikely to obtain the optimum result by starting with the design.

Card Sorting
The initial phases, when analysing the structure and organisation of an existing site in view of updating it ‘can’ benefit from card sorting. This consists of taking the different sections and seeing how users sort the different sections / areas into groups. It can help you understand how users would expect these different areas to be organised and therefore, where they would expect to find them. Different logical taxonomies may appear following the analysis as different user groups may sort cards in different ways. There are also 2 different types of card sorting, ‘open’ where no structure is predefined and ‘closed’ where participants are asked to place the cards in a pre-defined structure. Card sorting is not recommended to simply test a current site but should be considered as part of the process involved in defining the structure of a site that is being created or updated / redesigned. It can also help when adding or updating a new area to a site. As Nielsen explains more users are required in card sorting than in usability testing though. A fair amount of analysis is required to obtain useful findings.

Sitemap, user journeys, wireframes
By creating the recommended set of ‘sitemap / user journeys / wireframes’ you are capable of seeing black on white the optimum route a person will take. The organization and categorization of content blocks should be logical but can be modified to optimise the user journey outcome. A site should usually provide several optimised user journeys for the different types of target users / personas that have been identified.

Simplify the site and structure
Generation Y as opposed to generation X and the baby boomers are more net fluent and savvy online, capable of delving through content until they find the information they feel relevant and trustworthy. Their experience and knowledge provides near instantaneous gut feeling about a site. Uncluttered, simple pages with straightforward navigation principles just feel good. A pleasant experience on a web site that easily allows you to find what you are looking for is memorable simply because it is unfortunately a rare experience. This new generation and generations to come are a primary targets, neglecting them is not an option.

Simplify the design and content
Simple ways of communicating, avoiding the “noise” traditional designers want to apply in order to personalise or own their design can complicate things. Twitter, like SMS are two extremely simple ways of communicating, their restrictions simplify the communication.
Now is this to say that design is just powder in your eyes? Well, when applied by talented designers that know their target audience, how to play and innovate with the chosen medium and how to further optimise the previously crafted user journey, then obviously no.
A friend of mine works at the “Musée des Arts Décoratifs” in Paris, we discussed this concept when applied to modern decorative art. I was comparing the concept to artists capable of choosing specific material(s) and their ability to amplify the user experience and overall design through the selection of specific material(s). The technology but also the interfaces mechanisms of web sites are in this perspective key elements that a great designer will know and use to further his / her design.

Accessibility, standards, usability and web 2.0
Web applications are becoming more and more complex to the extent that they are starting to compete with desktop applications (ex. Google Maps and Mail, Flickr etc.). The interaction provided as well as both usability and accessibility when relying on standards are far better. Although the ‘web 2.0′ term is often used as a buzz word (see Zelman’s web 3.0 article) the term has undoubtedly helped spread the idea of more savvy websites, thought through and help improve user experience.

Twitter turns to Scala

You may have read articles explaining Ruby on Rails was the system behind Twitter and how there were numerous issues, for such a demanding and successful service as Twitter. In an article from Technology Review, Alex Payne from Twitter explains how they hope to replace a lot of the back-end systems in Ruby on Rails by Scala based services by the end of the year. Extract to understand what Scala is :

So the Twitter team turned to Scala, a programming language with its origins in work by Martin Odersky, professor at EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland, around 2003. During his presentation, Payne, who’s also writing a book on the language, explained that Scala has many of the benefits of other languages but without the drawbacks. Some of the characteristics that make Scala so appealing to Twitter is that it’s able to efficiently handle concurrent processing–that is, separate instructions that need to use the system’s resources at the same time. This is useful when messages from millions of people need to be sent out instantly to different devices all over the world.

Although Scala has, like any language, it’s weak points, it seems that the language has great advantages for a company like Twitter. It is a leap of faith though for the company, since there are few, to no examples out there comparable to Twitter.

Chrome shines with experiments

Yes it’s the weekend and another video following the Ray Ban viral video. This however is a far more geeky video, as it demonstrates the ability of Google Chrome with it’s super fast Javascript Engine (codename V8) to really show off.

You can also go and check these experiments out. Believe me though, not using Google Chrome, shows how good Google Chrome is. A clever way of showing how good Google Chrome is. And obvioulsy it shows up browsers like IE. Don’t even dream of trying it with IE6, once again life would be so much better without IE6… No but seriously, don’t try it with IE6; you’ll either crash/freeze your computer, or spend 10 minutes clicking ‘No’ on the Javascript debugging Console.