Changing memory on the 1005ha Asus EeePC

Very simple procedure. All you need is a small screwdriver and some gentle but determined hands ;)

Turn your closed netbook over
First turn your computer over so you can see the back of it as the image below:

Location of panel to change memory

Location of panel to change memory


Circled in red is the panel that has 1 screw you will need to remove to get access to the memory module that needs to be changed.

Remove the battery
I recommend that you remove the battery before attempting to touch the memory module.

1005ha PU1X-BK with battery removed

1005ha PU1X-BK with battery removed

Unscrew and remove the memory panel
Remove the screw as seen in the image below and remove the panel that will allow you to remove and replace the memory module:

1005ha view of memory panel removed

1005ha view of memory panel removed


Note: before touching the memory module I suggest you try to discharge any static electricity you may have. I grab hold of the chassis of my desktop for example. You should try to only hold the module by the edges and not touch any components on it. Avoid standing on a carpet for example or clothes that easily create electro static charge…

Unlock the memory module
You now need to push back the tabs on the side of the memory module that are holding it in the locked position. You will be pushing these for the top one upwards and slightly down and the bottom one downwards and slightly back. This should be done gently there is no need to force this to allow the memory module to slightly spring up so that it is at lifting up at the end that has the tabs.

1005ha memory module in locked position

1005ha memory module in locked position

Release bottom tab on memory module
As you can see below the tab when moved back releases one side of the memory module and you then only need to release the other tab for the whole module to spring upwards.

1005ha memory module bottom tab released

1005ha memory module bottom tab released

Remove the memory module
Once you have removed the tabs it should be slanted upwards on one side and look like the image below allowing you to then remove it. If you have an anti-static sleeve that your new module came in then put the old module in it so that if anything goes wrong with the new one you can at least put the old one back.

1005ha memory module slanted up

1005ha memory module slanted up

Add the new memory module
As you can see there is a groove on the memory module where it is connected to the motherboard. The number of pins above and below the groove is different so will help you know which way round the memory should be inserted. As you can see in the image below the groove on the connector is from the centre positioned to the left and the memory module therefore needs to be positioned in the same way .

1005ha memory insertion markers

1005ha memory insertion markers

Put the memory panel back
You can now put the memory module panel back, clipping it back in, then screw the panel back into position.

1005ha putting the memory panel back

1005ha putting the memory panel back

There you go you now have upgraded your 1005 ha EeePC to the maximum memory of 2 Gig. You should be fully prepared for Windows 7 now!

Changing keyboards on the Asus EeePC 1005ha

Changing keyboards on the Asus EeePC 1005ha is pretty easy as you can see below.

First you need to turn the computer over:

Back view of Asus EeePC 1005ha pu1x bk

Back view of Asus EeePC 1005ha pu1x bk

Remove the battery, then pull back tabs
Then you need to remove the battery in order to pull back the small tabs that are keeping the keyboard in place:

View of the latches under the battery on the Asus EeePC 1005ha

View of the tabs under the battery on the Asus EeePC 1005ha

Note : to pull the latches back only a small movement is required if you use a small sized screwdriver, like in the image below where you can see I then also used to gently pry up the keyboard

Pry up the keyboard
I recommend using a small screwdriver (needs to be small as can be seen below otherwise you’ll damage the keyboard) to pry up the keyboard. You need to do this with some force but most of all do it gently (ie. prying not wrenching). You will hear small clicks when you pry it off the points where it is clipped to the chasis:

Gently prying up the keyboard

Gently prying up the keyboard

Gently lift the keyboard out of its normal position
When you have successfully got the keyboard up you will see that it is attached (to the motherboard of the netbook) by a small connector so don’t yank the keyboard out, you need to pull it up gently and then unlock the ribbon from the connector:

1005ha Keyboard Connector

1005ha Keyboard Connector

Remove the keyboard connector
In order to remove the ribbon from the connector you need to release it by using the two black latches that can be seen in the image below (circled in red) and are keeping the connector in the fixed position. These need to be gently pushed up. In the same way when you put the ribbon of the other keyboard back into connector you need to push these two small black connectors back in to their locking position:

The 1005ha keyboard connector has been removed

The 1005ha keyboard connector has been removed

Attach the other keyboard connector
Final step you then need to gently push the other keyboard ribbon into the connector on the motherboard and lock the ribbon back into the connector by pushing the latches back into their locked position so that the ribbon is securely connected to the motherboard. I used one finger to hold the ribbon in place then my small screwdriver to gently push the latches of the connector back into a locked position (sorry no photo of this, you need both hands for this operation ;) ):

Attaching the other keyboard to the 1005ha

Attaching the other keyboard to the 1005ha

Push the keyboard back in
Probably the easiest step, you can now push the keyboard back in and then push the tabs under the battery back into their initial position. Voilà, now I hope this helps anyone that undertakes this fairly easy task, (compared to changing the hard disk) of changing the Asus 1005ha keyboard.

Note: check out Kevin’s comment about new ‘chiclet’ versions of the keyboard and plastic tabs that may need to be removed (22 Oct 2011)

Windows 7 64 bit on Dell XPS M1210

Well here I am, writing about how great the Windows 7 RC1 operating system is, directly from my Dell XPS M1210 64 bit version. Although I went through a fair amount of trial and error and one complete re-install I’m happy to say nearly all the core elements are recognised and no more yellow triangles with exclamation marks in the device manager.

The 2 most difficult where the Ricoh car reader and the Logitech QuickCam / webcam drivers.
The Ricoh card reader came up as a “base system device” issue. I solved this by downloading the driver from this site then installing the application that installs the x64 drivers.
The Logitech came up as an unrecognised USB device driver issue and Windows 7 OS itself allowed me to download the solution R151795 from the Dell site. When you try to install it this fails, you then just need to point the device manager system to the folder where this solution/drivers were extracted, so that it can install the drivers. This does not however install the software that you usually get from Logitech since it only picks up the drivers, which means other software can use it, but you won’t have the Logitech suite you usually get (personally doesn’t bother me but may be a problem for others)!

For an antivirus/firewall solution the latest ESET Smart security 4 works just fine on the 64 bit Windows 7 operating system.

For codecs I highly recommend either switching to VideoLan (but this is not yet available in a 64 bit version) or/and as I did, install the great Windows 7 codec package from Shark that can be downloaded here and 64 bit components to take advantage of your 64 bit Windows Media player for example here.

I’m also running the Office 2007 suite and even though it’s a pity that Windows itself hasn’t got at least a beta version in 64 bit out yet, it works fine and just installed the SP2 for Office 2007.

At the moment it seems easiest to use Internet Explorer 8 (not the 64 bit version) or another 32 bit browser like Chrome, to be able to view Flash content as there is still no 64 bit version of Flash player. For example the release candidate of Minefield, Firefox’s codename for the 64 bit version of their browser doesn’t have a Flash plug-in.

The main idea is that you can try drivers that are indicated as being for the specific hardware you have if they are supposed to work on Vista 64 bit, or wait untill another user explains that they have found what you need, if you don’t want to risk having to reinstall Windows 7 again…

Hope this helps other XPS M1210 owners out ;)

Update: Windows Update just informed of 3 downloads for the Ricoh Host Contoller (Memory stick, SD/MMC and xD Picture card) released in July, October and November 2008 along with the opportunity to download Silverlight!

Update 2: ‘Stir’ kindly provided the link for the Synaptic x64 driver here:
http://forums.laptopvideo2go.com/topic/15103-synaptics-driverver-v13-2-6-1/

Links
Download Windows 7 Release Candidate (both 32 bit and 64 bit versions available). Note: make sure you read the “Read this first” section.
The Windows 7 upgrade advisor

You should also know:
– When the final version of Windows 7 comes out you will not be able to upgrade to it so you will have to do a clean installation
– You can upgrade from Vista 32 bit to Windows 7 32 bit but you cannot upgrade from Vista 32 bit to Windows 64 bit. You cannot upgrade from any version of Windows XP to Windows 7 you’ll need to do a clean install. I would recommend a clean installation though ONLY after having backed up all your data as you will erase everything on your hard disk and I would recommend backing up your data even if you upgrade as you never know what can happen.
– The Windows 7 RC will stop working on June 1, 2010